×
Robin Williams Would've Turned 70 This Year, Fans Say Losing Him Was Hardest Celebrity Death To Get Over

Robin Williams Would've Turned 70 This Year, Fans Say Losing Him Was Hardest Celebrity Death To Get Over

Robin Williams is loved by all not only for his ability to makes us laugh but for his caring personality.

The world lost a gem of a man when Robin Williams passed on August 11, 2014. He would've turned 70 this year, on July 11, if it wasn't for his tragic and shocking death. Sure, there have been reports of celebrity deaths for decades but none impacted the world quite as much as the 63-year-old star's demise did. This was the topic of discussion in a recent Twitter thread where people began opening up about the deaths of celebrities that hit them the hardest. One user asked, "The death of which celebrity made you the saddest? For me, I'm still sad at the tragic loss of John Denver." The answers that followed made it clear that there was one tragic loss that was unbearable for most. 



 

 

There were some who mentioned the likes of David Bowie, John Lennon, and even Princess Diana. A fan wrote, "I was gutted when we lost Bowie. I'd lost someone close to me the year before and where are we now? had become a part of that process." Others mentioned Carrie Fisher and Karen Carpenter. "I think Carrie Fisher's death affected me the most. We'd just seen her on a British show and a couple days later, she was gone. Since it was shortly after her mom had passed away, it just... hit harder," shared another user.



 

 

But most answers had the name Robin Williams in them. "Four have hit me the hardest, in this order: Carrie Fisher, Robin Williams, Karen Carpenter, and Katharine Hepburn," noted Kris Harnage Phillips. Another expressed, "John Denver Watched Oh God a couple of months back Still a good message Rocky Mountain High, Colorado Micheal Jackson, Robin Williams, John Beluci, Will Farrell, Muhammad Ali, Bruce Lee, Roberto Clemente, if you aren't familiar with him look him up. All gone 2 soon." One user lamented the fact that they couldn't give him a hug when he needed it the most. "Yes. God. Why weren't we there to give him a hug when he needed it?" they wrote.

Here are some of the other touching responses:



 

 



 

 



 

 



 

 



 

 



 

 



 

 

Williams is loved by all not only for his ability to makes us laugh but for his caring personality. The legendary comedian even raised almost $50,000 for a food bank in Seattle between 2004-2008, according to NBC's Seattle affiliate KING 5-TV. Williams began extending his support to the West Seattle Food Bank back in 2004 and the money collected by a stand-up performance of his at the Showbox nightclub in Seattle went to it. The Jumanji actor's generous donation left everyone in awe of him, including the West Seattle Food Bank executive director Fran Yeatts. 

He returned to Seattle in 2007 and 2008 for more shows and gave all its proceeds to the food bank and the sum amounted to almost $50,000. "Robin Williams is the type of person who really understands there are a lot of people who are really, really struggling," said Yeatts. Unfortunately, when it came to his own struggles, he hid his true feelings far too well. "In Robin's case, on top of being a genius, he was a Julliard-trained actor. I will never know the true depth of his suffering, nor just how hard he was fighting," his wife Susan Schneider Williams wrote in an article published in Neurology



 

 

"But from where I stood, I saw the bravest man in the world playing the hardest role of his life," she continued. Despite his problems, he managed to spend a weekend doing things his wife enjoyed before his death. "We did all the things we love on Saturday day and into the evening, it was perfect—like one long date. By the end of Sunday, I was feeling that he was getting better." But he never did. "It was not depression that killed Robin. Depression was one of let’s call it 50 symptoms and it was a small one," she told PEOPLE

Sadly, Williams was diagnosed with Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) after his death. His doting wife Susan described his condition as a "terrorist inside my husband's brain."Robin was losing his mind and he was aware of it. Can you imagine the pain he felt as he experienced himself disintegrating?" she wrote. "And not from something he would ever know the name of or understand? Neither he nor anyone could stop it—no amount of intelligence or love could hold it back." She now hopes that by raising awareness about LBD, other lives may be saved.