×
Celebrity Mom Says She Watches Porn With Teen Sons To Educate Them

Celebrity Mom Says She Watches Porn With Teen Sons To Educate Them

Indonesian popstar Wahyu Setyaning Budi, known as Yuni Shara, wants to encourage her sons to be more open-minded.

An Indonesian popstar is making news for her unique parenting technique. Wahyu Setyaning Budi, known as Yuni Shara, took part in a candid interview on YouTube where she said it was "impossible" for children these days not to watch porn. She believes it's important that her two teen sons learn about sex the right way and didn't want to be an “old-fashioned” mother. The 49-year-old watches porn with her boys to teach them about the dos and don'ts of sex in real life. Yuni freely allows her kids to watch porn but admits that when she watches porn with her sons, it may be a step too far for them.



 

According to The Sun, in the interview she shared, "I think it’s better if I ask them, 'What do you guys think about watching (porn) together like this, is it cool?' and they’ll be like 'Mom, don’t be like this.'" But the celebrity wants to encourage her sons to be more open to learning and less judgemental. "My children also happen to be open-minded. It's impossible for our children nowadays to not watch porn, whether it's 'anime' or any other kind that are available nowadays," she shared. Even her younger sister, Kris Dayanti, agreed Yuni's parenting techniques were an important way for her boys to get proper sex education.



 

While some parents may not be too comfortable with this technique, some experts say this is a healthy way for young people to learn about sex. In many cultures, sex is a taboo topic and children often learn about sex through pornography, which isn't always a reflection of what sex is like in reality. Agstried Piether, a Youth Education Psychologist at Rumah Dandelion, told Indonesia outlet Antara News that Yuni was right not to scold or shame her kids after catching them watching porn. "When we see the kids watching pornographic movies, no matter how uncomfortable the situation is, we should never be angry, because they will only do it again in secret," he explained. "Through these discussions, parents can provide factual sex education based on their knowledge, and not based on porn films."



 

Over the years, porn has also been criticized for being sexist, catering to male audiences, and portraying women and sex in unrealistic standards. Cindy Gallop is the creator of an online platform called MakeLoveNotPorn, where users can submit videos of their "real world" sexual encounters. According to The New York Times, she admits that the concept of male pleasure being of prime importance has been certainly reinforced by “a male-dominated porn industry shot through a male lens."  Al Vernacchio, a nationally known sexuality educator and author of the 2014 book For Goodness Sex: Changing the Way We Talk to Teens About Sexuality, Values, and Health, adds that the problem with porn “is not just that it often shows misogynistic, unhealthy representations of relationships. You can’t learn relationship skills from porn, and if you are looking for pleasure and connection, porn can’t teach you how to have those.” Parents should want their teenagers to be generous lovers, Gallop argues, adding, “Our parents bring us up to have good manners, a work ethic. But nobody brings us up to behave well in bed.”